Reviews

Book Review: Ophelia’s War

Ophelia’s War: The Secret Story of a Mormon Turned Madam, by Alison McLennan

Publisher: Five Star Publishing; June 22, 2016

ophelias war

I feel like whenever I am reviewing a book it’s always positive, and I’ve had people even mention that.  One reason they are mostly positive is I try to really look at the synopsis before I read and review a book or check out other reviews if available, to see if I will enjoy reading it.  Some things I may be unsure of but give them a chance and end up thinking it was great. When I received a request to review “Ophelia’s War: The Secret Story of a Mormon Turned Madam,”  I didn’t hesitate because it sounded like a fantastic book.  I completely underestimated this novel and had no idea how amazing and well-written it would be.  Before even getting into my review, I rank this up there in my top ten reads ever, and believe me, I’ve read a lot.

This story begins with Ophelia Oatman, her half-brother Zeke (who is mixed ethnicity) and their parents heading to the Promised Land from Nebraska to Utah.  Early in the novel, we learn that as Ophelia’s mother lays dying, she gives Ophelia a ruby necklace which they sew into her doll.  Her mother tells her that it could bring her a fortune but it is also cursed. After the death of their parents, Ophelia and Zeke try to do the best they can and receive some help from the other Saints, but Ophelia fears becoming an older man’s 3rd or 4th wife.  Their mother had written to their Uncle Luther before her death, so his impending arrival prevents her from being married off. However, upon his arrival, they learn that Uncle Luther is a card shark and gambler, and loves his whiskey. Ophelia also learns that Luther has come to Utah for only one thing, the ruby necklace.  Luther’s arrival in Utah brings one heart-wrenching moment after another until Ophelia is separated from her brother and on the run across the frontier.

Once Ophelia is on her own and has left her home behind, the author takes us on an incredible journey of bravery, survival and coming of age. “Ophelia’s War” follows this young girl from her teenage years into adulthood, painting detailed pictures of what she does to survive and be successful as a madam in a small frontier town. On her journey to survive she goes by various names such as Elizabeth, Ruby Doll House, and Peach, but she remains the same brave woman from beginning to end. Ophelia is confronted with every type of person one could imagine encountering on the frontier. People try to kill her, people try to help her, people use her to gain wealth, and some people genuinely care. Moments in this novel will infuriate you and break your heart because it’s unimaginable that one girl could endure so much and survive.  Other moments you will cheer for Ophelia when she seems at peace with herself and her decisions.

Alison McLennan’s writing in “Ophelia’s War” is simply fantastic.  As you go through the novel it is moving, emotional and exciting all at once.  To read this novel is to think that McLennan herself has lived on and survived the frontier, the Mormons, and the devious thieves that one could encounter. This is not a sweet, light-hearted novel but instead, an honest look at what one does to survive, whether ideal or not. Alison McLennan has gone above and beyond exquisite writing and story-telling in “Ophelia’s War,” setting the bar extremely high for other writers in her genre and beyond.

Want to learn more about Alison McLennan?  Visit: http://www.alisonstories.com/

*I received this advanced copy from the author in exchange for an honest review. It is scheduled for release June 22.

 

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3 thoughts on “Book Review: Ophelia’s War”

  1. Wonderful review! And what a simply fascinating premise – I am so glad to hear it turned out to be as well written as it was interesting! This may be the perfect road-trip read for me this summer, as I will be visiting Utah for the first time in a couple weeks. Thanks 🙂

    Like

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